Department of Mathematics, Applied Mathematics and Statistics

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The Department of Mathematics, Applied Mathematics and Statistics at Case Western Reserve University is an active center for mathematical research. Faculty members conduct research in algebra, analysis, applied mathematics, convexity, dynamical systems, geometry, imaging, inverse problems, life sciences applications, mathematical biology, modeling, numerical analysis, probability, scientific computing, stochastic systems and other areas.

The department offers a variety of programs leading to both undergraduate and graduate degrees in traditional and applied mathematics, and statistics. Undergraduate degrees are Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science in mathematics, Bachelor of Science in applied mathematics, and Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science in statistics. Graduate degrees are Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. The Integrated BS/MS program allows a student to earn a Bachelor of Science in either mathematics or applied mathematics and a master’s degree from the mathematics department or another department in five years. The department, in cooperation with the college’s teacher licensure program and John Carroll University, offers a program for individuals interested in pre-college teaching. Together with the Department of Physics, it offers a specialized joint Bachelor of Science in Mathematics and Physics.

 

COMSOL Multiphysics, Application Builder and Fluid Flow Workshop

Date posted: February 4th, 2016

COMSOL Multiphysics, Application Builder and Fluid Flow Workshop
On March 18th, COMSOL will give a free multiphysics modeling workshop at Case Western Reserve University, where you will get hands-on experience with COMSOL Multiphysics and check out the new Application Builder and capabilities with Fluid Flow. …Read more.

Colloquium-February 12, 2016

Date posted: February 2nd, 2016

Friday, February 12, 2016 (3:00 p.m. in Yost 306)
Title: Uncertainty Principle for Discrete Schrödinger Evolution
Speaker: Yurii Lyubarskii (Professor, Department of Mathematical Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology)
Hosted by David Gurarie
Abstract: We prove that if a solution of a discrete time–dependent Schrödinger equation with bounded time–independent real potential decays fast at two distinct times then the solution is trivial. …Read more.