College of Arts and Sciences

Department of Mathematics, Applied Mathematics and Statistics

Department of Mathematics, Applied Mathematics and Statistics

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Department of Mathematics, Applied Mathematics and StatisticsYost hall

The Department of Mathematics, Applied Mathematics and Statistics at Case Western Reserve University is an active center for mathematical research. Faculty members conduct research in algebra, analysis, applied mathematics, convexity, dynamical systems, geometry, imaging, inverse problems, life sciences applications, mathematical biology, modeling, numerical analysis, probability, scientific computing, stochastic systems and other areas.

The department offers a variety of programs leading to both undergraduate and graduate degrees in traditional and applied mathematics, and statistics. Undergraduate degrees are Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science in mathematics, Bachelor of Science in applied mathematics, and Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science in statistics. Graduate degrees are Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. The Integrated BS/MS program allows a student to earn a Bachelor of Science in either mathematics or applied mathematics and a master’s degree from the mathematics department or another department in five years. The department, in cooperation with the college’s teacher licensure program and John Carroll University, offers a program for individuals interested in pre-college teaching. Together with the Department of Physics, it offers a specialized joint Bachelor of Science in Mathematics and Physics.

 

News

Mathematics of Life Sciences Seminar (MLSS) April 27, 2015

Date posted: April 14th, 2015

Monday, April 27, 2015 (3:15 p.m. in Yost 306)
Title: Dynamics of Neurons and Field Potentials in the Auditory Brainstem
Speaker: Joshua Goldwyn (Visiting Assistant Professor, Ohio State University)
Abstract: Neurons in the medial superior olive (MSO) are temporally precise coincidence detectors that support our ability to localize sound sources.  Questions persist regarding the precise workings of MSO neurons, in part because prominent sound-evoked extracellular field potentials hinder the acquisition of single cell in vivo data in the MSO.  […Read more]

Mathematics of Life Sciences Seminar (MLSS) April 20, 2015

Date posted: April 14th, 2015

Monday, April 20, 2015 (3:15 p.m. in Yost 306)
Title: The Role of Long Range Coupling in the Crayfish Swimmeret System
Speaker: Lucy Spardy (Postdoctoral Fellow, Mathematical Biosciences Institute, Ohio State University)
Abstract: The crayfish swimmeret system provides an ideal model for studying coordinated limb activity.  During forward swimming, four pairs of limbs move rhythmically in a back to front metachronal wave to propel the crayfish through the water. […Read more]

Colloquium- April 13, 2015

Date posted: April 6th, 2015

Monday, April 13, 2015 (3:15 p.m. in Yost 306)
Title: Data-Driven Modeling of Living Fluids
Speaker: M. Gregory Forest
Grant Dahlstrom Distinguished Professor
Departments of Mathematics & Biomedical Engineering
Director, Carolina Center for Interdisciplinary Applied Mathematics
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Abstract: I will talk about mathematical modeling of three fluid systems:  living yeast cells, living mammalian cells, and mucus.  In each fluid system, we collaborate with experimentalists and let their data and their biological or medical questions drive our mathematical modeling effort.   […Read more]

Mathematics of Life Sciences Seminar (MLSS) April 13, 2015

Date posted: April 6th, 2015

Monday, April 13, 2015 (3:15 p.m. in Yost 306)
Title: Data-Driven Modeling of Living Fluids
Speaker: M. Gregory Forest
Grant Dahlstrom Distinguished Professor
Departments of Mathematics & Biomedical Engineering
Director, Carolina Center for Interdisciplinary Applied Mathematics
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Abstract: I will talk about mathematical modeling of three fluid systems:  living yeast cells, living mammalian cells, and mucus.  In each fluid system, we collaborate with experimentalists and let their data and their biological or medical questions drive our mathematical modeling effort.   […Read more]

Analysis and Probability Seminar April 10, 2015

Date posted: April 6th, 2015

Friday, April 10, 2015 (1:00 p.m. in Yost 306)
Title: Banded Matrices and Fast Inverses
Speaker: Gilbert Strang (Professor of Mathematics, MIT)
Abstract: The inverse of a banded matrix A has a special form with low rank submatrices except at the main diagonal. That form comes directly from the Nullity Theorem. Then the inverse of that matrix A^-1 is the original A, which can be found by a remarkable “local” […Read more]

Colloquium- April 10, 2015

Date posted: April 2nd, 2015

Friday, April 10, 2015 (3:00 p.m. in Yost 306)
Title: From the Jones Polynomial to Khovanov Homotopy
Speaker: Robert Lipschitz (Associate Professor, Columbia University Department of Mathematics)
Abstract: We will start by introducing some basic questions in knot theory.  We will then talk about the Jones polynomial, a knot invariant from the 1980’s, and how it lets you answer some of those questions (some of the time).  We will then introduce two more refined knot invariants, […Read more]

Colloquium- April 3, 2015

Date posted: March 30th, 2015

Friday, April 3, 2015 (3:00 p.m. in Yost 306)
Title: Channel Capacity of Biological Signal Transduction Systems
Speaker: Peter Thomas (Associate Professor, Case Western Reserve University, Department of Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, and Statistics)
Abstract: Shannon’s mathematical theory of communication quantifies the information that can be transmitted by a given communication channel. Biological signal transduction systems operate through a coupled ensemble of chemical reactions — a signal transduction network —  […Read more]

Colloquium- April 17, 2015

Date posted: March 30th, 2015

Friday, April 17, 2015 (3:00 p.m. in Yost 306)
Title: Most Probably Intersecting Families of Subsets
Speaker: Gyula Katona (Renyi Institute, Budapest, and Member, Hungarian Academy of Sciences)
Abstract: Let F be a family of an n-element set. It is called intersecting if every pair of its members have a non-disjoint intersection. It is well- known that an intersecting family satisfies the inequality |F| ≤ 2^(n-1). Suppose that |F | = 2^(n-1) + i. […Read more]

Mathematics of Life Sciences Seminar (MLSS) March 30, 2015

Date posted: March 27th, 2015

Monday, March 30, 2015 (3:15 p.m. in Yost 306)
Title: Efficient Control of Schistosomiasis in Endemic Communities: Modeling In-Host Biology, Demographics, Diagnostics and Interventions
Speaker: Nara Yoon (Graduate Student, Case Western Reserve University MAMS Department)
Abstract: Schistosome is a parasitic worm that circulates between human and snail hosts through intermediate larval stages. Conventional modeling of Schistosomiasis transmission and control employs a “mean worm burden” (MWB) formulation. There is a need however, […Read more]

Spring 2015 Tutoring Sessions- MATH 223, MATH 224, and STAT 201 (Revised 3/26/15)

Date posted: March 26th, 2015

MATH 223 HELP SESSIONS

Monday
Yost Hall 335
3-4 p.m.

Tuesday
Yost Hall 343
11 a.m.-3 p.m.

Wednesday
Yost Hall 335
3-4 p.m.

Thursday
Yost Hall 343
11 a.m.-3 p.m.

 
MATH 224 HELP SESSIONS

Monday
Yost Hall 343
3-4:30 p.m.

Tuesday
Yost Hall 347
1-3 p.m.

Wednesday
Yost Hall 343
3-4:30 p.m.

Thursday
Yost Hall 343
1-4 p.m.

Friday
Yost Hall 343
12-2 p.m. […Read more]